Erotic depictions of women in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography from the dawn of man to the present.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

The Chronicles of Triple P: 1979 - Matriculation day


Matriculation day at the Sheldonian Theatre, Oxford


Although it is only a few days since I posted the latest of my Chronicles I have put the next episode up here.  The last episode attracted nine hundred views in just five days making it my fastest climbing entry so far.  In fact, this newest episode was originally meant to be part of the previous one but it ended up much too long.  The first couple of posts were about 2,000 words each, with the next batch being between 3,000 and 6,000.  The last one, at 8,500 words, was the longest and, if I hadn't split it, it would have come in at nearly 14,000 words. 




Some of the action in this latest episode takes place in my rooms at College.  I didn't have a good camera at the time and, sadly, never took a picture of them.  However, they are still in use by the College so I thought some people might be amused to see them as they are now; although they have changed somewhat in the last 35 years or so.  These two pictures show my living room.  I stuck all my pictures on the walls (which were painted a dingy cream) above the fireplace (where my precious gas fire used to be) and the mantelpiece is where I put my radio cassette player. I kept my mugs, plates, tea, biscuits and such like in the fitted cupboard in the right hand corner.




In my day all the furniture was dark wood. My desk was against the wall where the large bookcase is.  I did have two armchairs like this.  Actually, looking at them, they might even be the same ones!  One was further back in the corner under where the noticeboard is and the other was in front of the window next to my (much smaller) bookcase, which is where the modern desk is, in the top picture. Because the gas fire was active (and I had my own rug in front of it) the room was arranged much more with it as the centrepiece.   The door at the right, in the picture above, leads to my bedroom.




This was my bedroom.  I had no washbasin and my bed, which was wider and higher than this one, was where the washbasin and chest of drawers are today. Where the wardrobe is now, there was a large wooden box holding the knotted rope which was my fire escape!  My wardrobe was on the right with my chest of drawers where the bed is.  The rooms were very tall which made it difficult to get them warm, especially as the bedroom had no heating whatsoever!  The rooms had no carpets, then, just varnished wooden floorboards.

These rooms will feature a lot in future episodes!

4 comments:

  1. Your blog is an amazing mixture of high culture and dirty magazines. I don't remember what my rooms at New College looked like at all, but I don't recall those fireplaces and mantels, for sure. And I sure didn't have your luck with the women. Ah well! But it's great fun to read, and some of those magazine pics bring to mind memories of having seen them 35 years ago.

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    1. Thanks but I don't regard anything sexual as 'dirty'!

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  2. As a one time habitué of “Dark They Were and Golden Eyed” you should be familiar with the time when SF novels were typically only 40 to 50,000 words long (so that they could be easily serialised across four magazine issues). Of course, this was before publishers started to push up the minimum required word length, mostly I believe for marketing reasons.

    I mention this piece of trivia because the next part of your memoir should take you past the 60,000 words mark and thus well over the old length of a “short novel”. With another 45 years to go it looks like you may end up approaching the word count of “War and Peace”. I’m glad that, so far, I’m finding your memoir a good deal more fun to read than Tolstoy.

    Your recent progress also throws an interesting light on those authors who struggle for years to complete a book.

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    1. So true, When do you see a paperback just half an inch thick these days!

      There were quite a few ladies in my Oxford days!

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