Erotic depictions of women in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography from the dawn of man to the present.

Monday, February 23, 2015

No More Venuses!




Triple P has just received the following email from Blogger.

In the coming weeks, we'll no longer allow blogs that contain sexually explicit or graphic nude images or video. We'll still allow nudity presented in artistic, educational, documentary or scientific contexts, or where there are other substantial benefits to the public from not taking action on the content. The new policy will take effect on 23 March 2015. After this policy comes into force, Google will restrict access to any blog identified as being in violation of our revised policy. No content will be deleted, but only blog authors and those with whom they have expressly shared the blog will be able to see the content that we've made private.

So, in essence, Google has surrendered to a minority of people who see sex and nudity as evil and something to be banned.  We will be unable to post any more in our Pubic Wars series or any other magazine pictorials.  Hopefully we will be able to continue to post images of art and, hopefully "artistic nude photography but the term "graphic nude images is terrible vague.  How do they define "graphic" and who defines it?

Google say there is a way to download your blog content but it doesn't work, needless to say. I am hoping to remove any "offensive" images from The Adventures of Triple P and Cavegirls in Fur Bikinis by the cut-off date to keep them going as they are.

We have set up a site "More Venus Observations" on which we will continue to post about art and art photography, if the ayatollahs at Google will let us.  

The really worrying this is, what is next?  Sexually explicit stories?  Any nudes? Anything else they don't like?  This is the sort of thing countries like Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia or China do.  

I believe that the blogs will not be deleted but will remain "private"  which means we can grant permission for individuals to see our blogs.  If you would like to continue to see our blogs after 28th March we will add your email address to the blog members list.  Please email Triple P at agenttriplep AT yahoo dot co dot uk.  If there are enough subscribers we might be able to continue blogging as a private members blog.

Update: 21 people have signed up so far!  More than enough for me to continue working on it!  Thank you all for your kind words of support!

For everyone else, thanks for your interest over the years.

30 comments:

  1. Google surrenders to no one; I imagine this is a unilateral decision on their part. US Google already restricts access to this blog, so it remains to be seen if they intend to take their censorship, I mean, their "fight to eliminate the virulent rape culture in Western society" further. This blog is always tastefully and amusingly done, so I hope it continues in as close to its current form as possible.

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  2. Let's think Tumblr, they are going to rejoice at this puritan move by google.

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  3. This is an aggregating load of crap! Not from you. It seems arbitrary. As you said who defines the criteria?

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  4. The "Burka Brigade" strikes again...

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  5. Please look into tumblr or reddit.

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    1. Just registered with Tumblr but it's not exactly intuitive!

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  6. The state that I live in enacted legislation that prohibits posting nude photos of people without having their consent. Technically a blog like this would run afoul of this as you don't have releases for each photo posted. I am only guessing here, I believe that there are other states in the US that have done the same. I wonder if it is relevant to Google's decision.

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    1. Ah yes, this is the anti revenge porn legislation...

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  7. Add me to the list. I got a notice, too. When I read it, I immediately thought of you and the Venus blog! This sucks!!

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  8. I'm in the same boat, as I have a vintage blog with, heaven forfend, cleavages on it. I think it is about Google's powerful advertising clients who are worried about nudity but don't mind graphic violence, which is apparently OK? I'm migrating to Tumblr although having some trouble doing so. I'll be sorry to leave and sorry to see your excellent blog censored, thanks for all the great posts.

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  9. This blog is not only tastefully and amusingly done, as said by RK Larkin, but it's also useful for those interested in the full history of the last decades. All the posts on the pubic wars are really interesting for historians. So I will be in the blog's member list if possible.

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  10. I hate to hear this and I hate to see this blog disappear. It was and is one of the best I have seen in the 13 years I follow blogs. Try to continue, Triple P.

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  11. Second attempt (It refused to recognise my ID before)

    I'm not sure this move is based purely on puritanism or " minority of people who see sex and nudity as evil and something to be banned". There are other issues to consider. Yes, at first I thought that in general all you were doing was posting commentary on images the majority of which have been taken from mass circulation magazines easily available in mainstream newsagents at no great expense, and that there is a whole world of wrong elsewhere on the web that is far more likely to attract the less savoury consumer.

    "Revenge porn" isn't the sole issue, although the absence of consent to publication to a potentially worldwide audience is the issue. As we know, the ECtHR has now stated that the average citizen has the right to have their youthful follies forgotten after a reasonable passage of time. There is thus a risk that someone, now a mother and grandmother aged sixty, living in a religiously conservative house, who had no concept in 1974 when they received £!00 for a few nude shots and signed a disclaimer, that there would ever be a mechanism whereby there pictures could be seen free of charge anywhere in the world. while I suspect you have never been asked to remove pictures, it's easy to envisage several suggestions where someone could argue that republishing old photographs does breach their Convention rights.

    Thus, on balance I can see Google's point, as any action would also be raised against them as the webhosts, so I'd err on the side of caution.

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  12. These are good points. However I doubt that Google is concerned about the feelings of models from the past when they seem to have no concern as regards the feelings of today;s celebrities.

    In fact I have taken down a number of pictures at the request of the models involved and have spoken, when doing so, about the fact that people cannot have contemplated the existence of the internet when they posed for pictures.

    If there is any message in this blog over and above a simple appreciation of the naked human body it is that those bodies should be celebrated and appreciated and not be seen as a source of shame or embarrassment. I am afraid that I have absolutely no time for any organised religion especially those that promote shame and embarrassment (and always have) as a way to impose peculiar and unnatural visions of morality often, historically, designed to make women, in particular, second class citizens.

    But thank you for a thoughtful comment. I was not aware of the ECtOHR ruling as I am afraid I hold the European Union (having worked with it closely over the years) and its apparatchiks in equal contempt.

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  13. Oh no! You must be gutted. It would be great if you could migrate to some anioher blog site. But thank yu regardless for this labour of love (with a bit of lust) over the years. It's been informative, entertaining, nostalgic & (dare I say it?) stimulating. You should talk to Taschen about doing a deluce Public Wars book.

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  14. While these revenge porn laws have come into effect recently, technically, posting any nude photo online without specific consent has been illegal under US federal law for over two decades (see those Certificates of Compliance on videos & web sites). In the meantime, there hasn't been a mass arrest of Twitter users, porn bloggers, etc., so I don't think that's behind Google's decision.

    Frankly, Google has lost the blogging platform war to WordPress and the photo storage war to Tumblr (and even Twitter, and Instagram for non-porn), and they want to get out of the content management and photo storage businesses, without creating the negative PR they get when they shut down Reader, and other less popular, but useful services. So, since the Blogger platform has failed from a technology, business, and advertising perspective, they're using this smokescreen to decimate the traffic load of Blogger. Let's face it, this directive obliterates 90% of Blogger's outgoing traffic by volume, since they realized that Blogger was being used as a de facto Tumblr.

    I would say that there are a number of options, without stooping to Reddit, or missing out on new readers by making this a private, e-mail invitation, blog:

    1. LiveJournal is still around, and they still appear to have a flagging system, similar to Blogger. Flag your blog as adult, and they'll probably leave you alone. Converting old posts from here to there might not be possible, though WordPress is probably the only platform that would accept these posts directly (which would require hosting fees, since the WordPress.com site doesn't host any erotica, etc. blogs).
    2. Tumblr is an option, but the historical context contained in the text doesn't really fit in with Tumblr's concept. Basically, Tumblr is a personal photo dumping site, similar to Flickr, and has come to be synonymous with people dumping their porn. The company says that 2-4% of their traffic is porn, and by that they mean, 50%. Another text-only posting platform would be a kludgy, but necessary adjunct.
    3. Twitter is popular among a huge number of photo bloggers, such as myself. However, it's frustrating to use for that purpose, and you have to deal with the aspects of it being primarily a social network. You'll just be one of thousands of photo bloggers, with no way of differentiating yourself. However, at this point at least, no sign-up is required to view a "profile" in Twitter. This is something that Twitter would love to change, or at least modify, but they can't, since a large number of ads are being fed to readers just viewing a Twitter profile for an individual's tweets, without signing up. You would also still have the text adjunct problem, though several "long-tweet" services exists to provide a better option than Tumblr.

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  15. As a 50 year old man, I find your blog to be a curated trip down memory lane. Your insight on the evolution of mass produced erotica is unsurpassed, and supported by the evidence you have been able to collect and scan with care. The Pubic Wars was a brilliant review of the arms race between publishers and censors. Thank you for your dedicated work and illuminating efforts on venusobservations.

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  16. If this blog has not been "artistic, educational, documentary" then I don't know what is. Of course Google will decide what those words mean, As they changed the meaning of “Censoring this content is contrary to a service that bases itself on freedom of expression.”

    The delightful Violet Blue has instructions for transloading (I might have made that word up) your entire blog to other platforms. http://www.tinynibbles.com/blogarchives/2015/02/google-wants-you-to-stop-using-blogger-heres-how-to-leave.html

    If you don;t follow her sex news links roundups then I suggest that you start.

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  17. "We'll still allow nudity presented in artistic, educational, documentary or scientific contexts" well this blog is at least both educational and documentary!

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  18. Dear Agent Triple P

    Please note that the ECtHR has NOTHING AT ALL to do with the European Union. It is the supreme court of the Council of Europe, a body whose membership consists of every sovereign state in Europe bar two, namely Belarus and the Vatican. Thus those seeking to have the UK withdraw from the European Convention on Human Rights wish this state to stand alongside a tiny state whose leadership consists entirely of celibate males, and the last surviving true one-party dictatorship, where freedom of speech is repressed.

    Turning to your main points, I note that you hqave withdrawn some pictures on request and do not demur from any of your comments in paragraph 3 . While your tastes and mine are often different, it's your blog not mine, and I do unquestionably see the hand of censorship by an organisation answerable only to itself, whose reach into our lives has become very disturbing.

    I wish you all the best and trust that you will find a more welcoming home elsewhere on the Net.

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    1. Ah, some of the EctHR's decisions are so random I thought that they MUST be part of the EU!

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  19. Your blog is amazing. Google's decision is an abuse of dominant position

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  20. Ridiculous censorship of a beautiful blog. The "net" is, quite literally, closing in on us. People predicted this, and they were scoffed at. Now look!

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  21. I hope this message is enough to subscribe. Otherwise, thank you to indicate your email address. Long live your blog!

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    1. No as it does not include your email address I have included my email address in my post It is:

      agenttriplep AT yahoo DOT co DOT uk with the bits in capital letters to be replace by @ . . of course.

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  22. I would like to add to my previous comment mentioning LiveJournal...even if you don't move the blog, Triple P, maybe another blogger might find this info useful. I've reviewed (by that I mean, slogged) through a bunch of Terms of Services of a couple dozen alternate blogging sites, paid and free, and found that most have a problem with adult content. It should be noted, for the record, that most of these sites have discussed their "funding issues" on their site, as well. I guess there are just not that many people interested in blogs about people's "Journeys with Jesus" and "First-Wave Feminism". Anyway, I found an interesting conglomerate of sites that don't have any problem with adult content, at least for now (a couple are overseas, of course):

    1. Quora (does have blogging features now)
    2. LiveJournal
    3. Typepad (may be paid only now, though)
    4. Soup.io (Austrian-based, but a tad short on blogging features)
    5. Silvrback

    Some of these also include some conversion features from other blogs. A few others don't warn you up front about adult content. This may or may not mean you'll have no problem with them, but trying a free blog and seeing what happens is an option:

    1. Posthaven
    2. Sett
    3. Weebly
    4. Postagon

    Once again, if anyone can make good with this information, that's great.

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  23. Seen this:http://the-digital-reader.com/2015/02/27/google-backs-down-wont-ban-adult-images-on-blogger/?

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    1. Well, well, well! Let;s see if here is a backlash to the backlash!

      Some hope!

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  24. Never been here before but I'm glad to hear more discussion on the weird way Google has been acting lately. Nice images and community here.

    Mr. Xploit
    http://xploiting.blogspot.com/

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