Erotic depictions of women in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography from the dawn of man to the present.

Friday, April 18, 2014

8 million visits...and Jolanda Eggar



Yesterday Venus Observations passed 8,000,000 visits.  The last 500,000 of which were in just over two months.  As usual we will celebrate this milestone by finding some pictures of an undressed young lady from the country with the population closest to the number of views.




That country is Switzerland (pop. 7,997,000) and so we present Miss Jolanda Eggar, the only Playboy Playmate born in Switzerland.  She was Playmate of the Month for June 1983.  Given we have spent a lot of time today doing grubby work in clearing out the garage we have decided to feature Miss Eggar in some bathtime photos.  Who wouldn't want her to scrub your back at the end of the day?




The same month she was Playmate of the Month in German  Playboy but, unlike the US issue she went on to be German Playmate of the Year appearing in the June 1984 issue. 




Playboy Germany wasn't as coy as the US edition about getting its Playmates to display their charms on the cover of  the magazine in the mid-eighties.




Jolanda made a couple of very undistinguished films; one before and one after her Playboy appearance.  She lived in the Playboy Mansion for a year but was not one of Hugh Hefner's girlfriends, she later said.  Probably not blonde enough.





Later she was involved in motor racing and even raced Formula 3 cars.  She married fellow Swiss, Formula 1 racing driver, Marc Surer although they divorced seven years later and she is now on her third husband, who she married on her fiftieth birthday.  She is exactly three days older than Agent Triple P!




She was born in Luzern, a lovely city in Switzerland which Triple P first visited on one of the splendid steamers which the Swiss run across the lake.




A leggy 5' 8" tall she is a splendid example of Swiss womanhood and an excellent way to celebrate eight million views!

Thursday, April 10, 2014

Venus with Pasta 4: ready for a taste




Time for another Venus with pasta.  We don't know where these pictures originate from but they remind us, in some ways, of our friend I, from Rome, who taught Triple P a lot about pasta dishes during the mid to late eighties until the early nineties when we spent a lot of time in Italy.  Although I was a blonde (ish) her figure was not dissimilar to this leggy young lady.




We can remember at least one incident where she cooked us dinner dressed just in an apron (although hers was a Playboy rabbit head one - oddly, Triple P's mother had one as well).  Triple P had been out running along the Via Appia Antica one morning, while training for the London Marathon.  Having done about ten miles he returned to I's apartment in Corso Vittorio Emanuele II to find her wandering about in her silk dressing gown looking elegantly lovely as usual.  Given we had only just got together we were still at a very intensive physical stage.  Aroused, she said, by Triple P's post-run healthy glow she pounced.  Six hours later, having missed lunch as a result of I's amorous advances, she agreed to knock up something for an early supper.  Donning her Playboy apron she soon put together a delicious bowlful of bucatini all'amatriciana.

Delizioso!

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Unshaven Venus: Aida Folch





Last night Triple P watched the Spanish film El artista y la modelo (2012) which he greatly enjoyed.  About an ageing sculptor (Jean Rochefort) working with a new young model on his last masterpiece it carried a lot of resonance for Triple P as regards the relationship between artists and model.




The model is played by Catalonian actress Aida Folch, who looks like a cross between Liv Tyler and Letitia Herod, Triple P's local supermodel.  She not only displays a luxuriant bush but also delightfully fluffy armpits as well.  The film is shot in luminous black and white, perhaps to stop you being completely overwhelmed by Miss Folch's naked body, which is on display much of the time.


Colour behind the scenes shot of Miss Folch in full-on fluff mode


Triple P has always been artistically inclined and contemplated going to art school at the recommendation of his art teachers.  You don't make money out of art unless you are very, very lucky so we decided to go to university instead and abandoned our formal art training.  Our school allowed us to do A level art at school (for an examination at the age of eighteen) even though we had given up studying it formally.




Since then we have spent many happy hours drawing naked women (we soon realised that there was little point in any other form of art - although we did do some pen and ink work of buildings) and indeed has started relationships with some of them purely on what was just an initial artist/model relationship.  A few years ago the results of a survey was published which said that artists had more sex with more women than people in any other job.  Whether this is because of a naturally sensitive disposition, an unconventional "creative" outlook or because drawing naked women is a key part of artistic training we don't know.  




Relationships developing between artists and there models are not uncommon as, for example, in the case of Egon Schiele and Wally Neuzil which we looked at in a previous post.  Many artists settle on one particular woman to act as their muse for many works, such as Sir William Russell Flint and Cecilia Green and Lord Leighton and Dorothy Dene.  In the film the artist's wife (played by an unrecognisable Claudia Cardinale) had been the sculptor's muse until this new young girl turned up in his village having fled from General Franco's Spain in the middle of World War 2.




The other area of resonance for Triple P is that the film is set in the Pyrénées-Orientales; that part of France on the Mediterranean end of the Spanish border.  Triple P used to go to the region on holiday every year from the age of four until he was thirteen.  Unlike another film of director Fernando Tueba's which we enjoyed, Belle Epoque (1992), which was set in Spain but filmed in Portugal, El artista y la modelo was filmed in the region although, oddly, largely on the Spanish side of the mountains.  The locals all like to regard the region as one unified Catalonia anyway.




Anyway, back to Miss Folch and her fluffy surfaces.  The director had informed her she would have to stop shaving for the part.  This is certainly something you wouldn't see in American TV or film (Barbara Carrera as an Indian squaw in the TV miniseries Centennial being a notable exception) but European actresses don't have a problem with it, as Penelope Cruz has demonstrated on several occasions.




As Triple P has mentioned before he has experienced the full gamut of armpit hair from white blonde (V) through bright orange (C) to blue black (P, who was Sicilian).  We don't recoil in horror at it as most Americans and young people in the UK do, as in the seventies and early eighties it was not unusual on young women in Britain.  They'd maybe tidy themselves up for the summer.  After all women didn't start to shave their armpits until Gillette made it an issue (which it absolutely hadn't been before) with women in the US, given the new sleeveless dresses in the nineteen twenties.  They just wanted to sell more razors.




The truth is that while it looks odd with very formal clothes (Julia Roberts at her red carpet incident a few years ago) when a woman is naked or casually dressed Triple P actually finds it positively sexy.  Provided, that is, that it isn't swamped in tongue shrivelling deodorant.  It's a mixture of "I don't care" and primitive earth mother, we suppose. Anyway we liked the soft quality of it when we had girlfriends displaying fluff: sliding your hands up from smooth, soft breasts to fluffy armpits created a delightful tactile cocktail.  The only issue we have is with the word "armpit" which is, as Monty Python would have said, a "tinny" word rather than a "woody" word.  If only there was a nice word analogous to "pussy"!
What we don't like is stubble, however, so all on or all off!




Finally, an oddity which sums up the difference between the US and UK on matters of film classification is that in the US this film is rated 'R'.  This means that an under seventeen attending has to be accompanied by a parent or guardian.  This, the second highest rating in the MPAA system, is usually reserved for films with sexually oriented full frontal nudity.   Although there is  a lot of female full frontal nudity in the film it isn't sexual, there is no violence and no swearing.  So in Britain it has been classified as a '12' certificate. In France it was a 'U' (tous public) the same as, for example, a Disney animation.  In its home country of Spain it got a APTA rating "suitable for all audiences; the same as. for example Mary Poppins.  Of course, if it had no nudity but lots of violence it would have got a lower rating in the US.  We know that many Americans came from Puritan stock but, honestly, that was nearly four hundred years ago.  When are they going to realise that everyone is naked underneath their clothes and its not going to destroy the world!




Triple P was reminded of an incident in Boston's splendid Museum of Fine Arts. which he was visiting about eighteen months ago with his particular friend S, from Vancouver who, being half French, thinks that American views on nudity are quaint.  We were standing next to a renaissance painting of some naked cherubs in a painting of the Virgin Mary.  A group of schoolchildren of about eight or nine walked past and started saying "eew that's disgusting!"  To be fair the (woman) teacher replied with "no it's not, it's beautiful" but, honestly, something is going very wrong somewhere over there.




So let's celebrate the natural loveliness of Aida Folch in all her fluffy gorgeousness.  She is a fine actress too and we will look out for more films she appears in.




As for the film itself it's not as much fun as Belle Epoque and as an artist and model film it's not as good as La Belle Noiseuse (1991) but it's a pleasant way to spend an hour and forty minutes, especially with a bottle of rose wine and some olives.

Monday, March 31, 2014

Paperback Venus: Raven Swordsmistress of Chaos





As a teenager Agent Triple P was never a fantasy fiction reader preferring, on the whole, hard SF.   He was, however, in 1978 very interested in young women and illustration.  Illustrations of young women were, therefore, particularly interesting.  So he bought the novel Raven: Swordsmistress of Chaos on the basis of the cover picture alone, as the publishers no doubt intended.




The novel was a sort of sub-Red Sonja effort (although we hadn't read any Red Sonja novels at that point), commissioned at a time when a new series of Conan books had been successfully published in the UK.  Unlike Conan, however, Raven contained, excitingly, lashings of sex which you certainly didn't get in the science fiction we were reading at the time.  Author Richard Kirk was actually a pen name for two authors: Angus Wells (1943-2006) and the better-known Robert Holdstock (1948-2009).






Wells would go on to write the second novel in the series (also with Holdstock) and the third and fifth Raven novel on his own.  Holdstock would pen the fourth.  All had covers featuring their enticingly clad fantasy heroine by Chris Achilleos.  Despite producing five books in the series the story was left unfinished. 




Raven, was described breathlessly in the first book's introduction (the story is told in flashback):

"She was a woman, Raven! There are none like her today. Tall, she was; her hair as golden soft as the sun on a late summer evening. And her eyes blue as a mist-kissed sea pool, blue and green and grey mingled together in a manner that could suck the soul out of a man, if she chose. Though I’ve seen them red with blood and cold as the wind from the northern ice wastes. She was a woman you whelps might dream about, damping your blankets with the thought. She smiled as she killed, and if she chose a man, he went to the furs ready to die for sheer pleasure."





The full version of Raven: Lords of the Shadows demonstrates how Achilleos would sometimes paint more than the brief required to satisfy his own artistic standards.  In this case, regarding what he felt would be the most visually harmonious composition


Cover artist Chris Achilleos was born in Cyprus in 1947 but moved, with his family, to the UK in 1960 and started at Hornsey College of art in 1965, beginning to work in book illustration at the end of the sixties.  He produced all the other covers for the Raven books.




This version of the painting for Raven: A Time of Dying had to be altered in 1984 to cover up all the bare skin for a jigsaw puzzle version


These illustration appeared at the height of his book cover work from 1977-1978.  Unfortunately, despite the positive critical reaction to his work. commissions dried up from UK book publishers due to a slump in the SF and fantasy paperback market and partly because his very detailed paintings took a long time to produce). Achilleos kept himself employed by doing pin up paintings for Paul Raymond's Men Only.




Here is Achilleos' first attempt at a cover for Raven: A Time of Ghosts.  Maybe the publishers thought that the static pose was too similar to the cover of the first book and so asked for something featuring more action.




It eventually saw the light of day as the cover for the Uriah Heap album Fallen Angel in 1978.  The sleeve was a gatefold one with the image, unusually, being in a vertical, not horizontal, format.




Anyway, we thought of these Raven illustrations when we heard on the radio yesterday that Kate Bush was embarking on her first tour for thirty five years.  Just one year after her last concerts in 1979 the video for her single Babooshka contained this reinterpretation by Pamela Keats of the costume Achilleos featured in his original painting.




Agent Triple P remembers watching the video at the time and thinking "that's the Raven costume!"  Achilleos wasn't involved in the video but it is noticeable that he gets a credit for the design when the video is discussed today.  We suspect he wasn't contacted about it at the time!




When Roger Dean contacted Achilleos about producing a book of his illustrations in 1978 it was the first Raven image which was used on the cover, although poor Raven's bust was censored by a black star.


Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Venus Revealed: The Pubic Wars Part 11 1979 part 3




The release of the Roger Moore James Bond film Moonraker (1979) had got many of the men's magazines rooting around to see if they could find previously shot photographs of some of the Bond girls wearing as little as possible.  Playboy was no different and trailed its offering on the Tom Staebler photographed cover using New York model Denise Gauthier who was not, however, an actual Bond girl but channeled the vibe perfectly.




She later appeared on the cover of the Mexican version of Playboy which was originally launched, with Patti McGuire as Playmate of the Month, under the name Caballero in November 1976.  The issue Denise fronted in May 1981 was the first one to appear under the new name of Signore.  Denise went on to make a few appearances in TV shows in the early eighties. 


Patti McGuire: one of Triple P's all time favourites!


And speaking of Patti McGuire. the Playmate of the Year for 1977 featured in July 1979's month's first pictorial, on account of her recent marriage to tennis superstar Jimmy Connors.   Astonishingly, Connors cheated on her (look at her for heaven's sake!) early on in their marriage and she actually started divorce proceedings against him. They stayed together, however, and, amazingly for a celebrity couple, they are still together over 35 years later.  








Several of Richard Fegley's shots of Playmate of the Month Dorothy Mays (top and middle) showed a glimpse of her bits but not to the extent of the splendid shot that appeared in the layout in the French version of Playboy that same month (er, bottom).




Agent Triple P certainly bought this issue when it came out as he was earning quite good money (nearly all spent on women in his first year at college!) in his gap year before starting university that September.  Our favourite shot of Dorothy was this one and it is still one of our favourite Playboy shots from the late seventies.  It's the way she can't quite seem to stay inside her outfit!




The first girl featured in the pictorial on the girls from Moonraker was the most well known of them, French actress Corinne Cléry who had shot to fame in 1975's Histoire d'O.  


Corrine indulges in a little nipple nibbling in The Story of O (1975)


She was no stranger to Playboy having appeared in various foreign editions as well as Lui, Oui and other magazines.  Nearly 30 at this point, she would continue to appear in (mostly Italian) films that usually required her to tastefully remove all her clothes.  Her last acting credit is as recent as 2010.






Gallery continued not to push at the boundaries of anything, other than JFK conspiracy theories.  The women inside were defiantly early seventies in style with Adrienne Mandie being a typical Siwar Ohlsson beached nude; this time located in Morocco.


From Orion Magazine


Pictures from this shoot turned up in a number of other magazines, demonstrating how a photographer could maximise his return if able to sell to those magazines who bought in pictorials from freelancers, rather than having staff photographers, like the bigger magazines.




She actually appeared in Mayfair as their centrefold the very same month, where she was called Marion Hannington-Smith.  Mayfair did like to pretend its girls were all posh types from the shires.


The cover of the Dutch Seventeen magazine from 1980


E mois from France



As late as 1988 these pictures were appearing in the German magazine, Sexy.  They just demonstrate that if you avoided fashionable clothes or hairstyles and just photographed a naked woman in a neutral setting you could make money from the pictures for years.




She appeared in the venerable British nudist and naturist magazine Health and Efficiency in 1983.


August 1938


Health and Efficiency, as the title suggests, was a magazine that looked at issues such as diet and exercise. It was first published in 1900 but soon caught on to the growing naturist movement coming from Europe, and Germany in particular, in the nineteen twenties.  The first naturist club in the UK was founded in Essex in 1924.  From the late twenties through to World War 2 naturism, rather than healthy lifestyle, became the dominating subject of the magazine.


January 1954


After the second world war naturism really took off in the UK (surprisingly, considering our weather) and H&E reflected this, providing details of clubs around the country as well, of course, of lots of scrupulously retouched photos of naked people as, unlike their continental equivalents, no pubic hair could be shown but nipples could be shown on the cover due to the "documentary" nature of the magazine.


1960s


Although there were, no doubt, lots of genuine naturists amongst the readership the magazine provided an almost unique, for the period, opportunity for ordinary British people to look at photographs of naked people, perhaps for the first time.  The magazine consisted of black and white photos in a small digest sized format.


1978


The coming of the likes of Mayfair and Penthouse in the mid sixties and the increasing use of topless photographs in UK newspapers such as The Sun from November 1970 must have hit the general circulation of the magazine outside the proper naturist community.


October 1979


By 1979 the magazine was full sized and contained colour photographs. Covers featured women displaying their nipples in a way that the other men's magazines no longer did in the UK at this time.  H&E could get away with this because, the argument went, this was non-sexualised nudity.  Right.


H&E 1986


Pictorials usually consisted of shots of attractive young women usually by a pool or beach.  These were usually posed by some of the top glamour models of the day, who occasionally were portrayed with more normal naturists as well; often photographed in some of the popular European resorts where the sun shone a lot more than in Britain.


1980


There was, in fact, very little difference between the sort of shots H&E was using at this time and those in the less explicit men's magazines like Mayfair and often they would use the same models and shoots, as we have seen.


H&E September 1978


Here, for example, is popular men's magazine model Virginia Winter in a bold, labia revealing shot as strong as anything on UK top shelves in 1978.  Virginia (or Debbie or Samantha as she was also billed) appeared in UK magazines like Men Only and Mayfair as well as US magazines like Gallery, Club and Cavalier in the late seventies.




Men Only April 1975


Here she is on the cover of Men Only in 1975, right at the start of her modelling career.  H&E, of course, continued to declare that it was a magazine about naturism and not a pornographic magazine like those, as they saw it, in the Paul Raymond stable, but you could see why some critics failed to see the difference.


 H&E January 1978



H&E June 1978


H&E were obviously fond of "Virginia" as she also appeared in some photos with a man in 1978 on two separate occasions.  By this stage the couples pictures in the magazines were showing some hints of affection between the men and the women rather than then just having them tossing beach balls to each other.


Virginia enjoys a penis away from the beach in Swedish Erotica magazine


Virginia would have been quite happy posing like this, as by this period she had become a hardcore porn star in the US, appearing in films and magazines a lot more explicit that H&E.  So the women depicted as average naturists in the magazine were often nothing of the kind.


September 1978


H&E 1978

H&E May 1984


H&E 1984


By the end of the seventies and into the eighties H&E were occasionally allowing pictures that showed glimpses of the girls' labia.  Some of the poses adopted by the girls were really no different from those appearing in the likes of Mayfair.


1986


Another popular feature was to show two girls together.  Non-sexually, of course, but still many of the shoots would have been equally at home in the UK men's magazines where the more overtly lesbian shoots seen in the US magazines were replaced by two girls simply posing with each other.



1978


There were far more photos of women than men, which does question the pure naturist outlook of the magazine somewhat.  When men did appear they were usually shown, as we have seen, with a girl; almost inevitably at the beach or by a pool.  Because of the sun tan health benefits origins of some of the magazines that were absorbed by H&E through its history, depictions of naturists indoors were rare in the magazine.




There was no question of any explicit sexual element between the couples although into the eighties the couples sets got longer and there was an increasing number of sun tan oil shots which were testaments to the gentlemen's self control.


H&E July 1986


In the mid seventies some of the men's magazines in the UK (such as Fiesta) had included couples pictorials and even had the male models flashing their penises on occasion but, led by Paul Raymond's publications in 1977, the magazines had become less explicit and the boy/girl sets disappeared.  This left H&E as about the only magazine you could buy in high street stationers' chains, like WH Smith and John Menzies, which contained pictures of naked men and women together.


H&E July 1986


The above two pictures come from H&E in 1986 and show a man (or is it a hobbit?) who appears slightly more entranced by his female companion in the second picture.


H&E 1981


The reality of real naturists as depicted in the magazine was very different from the professional models in most of the photographs of course.




As was becoming the norm, Oui's cover girl, shot by Phillip Dixon didn't feature inside the magazine at all, sadly.  A Dutch model called Maren who was (believably) six feet tall she was almost certainly a fashion model, so may not have posed nude anyway.




Dark haired Roya flashed her bits in a couple of shots in her pictorial by Jeff Dunas. although the standout photo for Agent Triple P is this one, where she is overflowing her knicker crotch in a very enticing way.




The centrefold was Tessa, photographed by John Kelly in the Bahamas.  She looks vaguely familiar so could have been a British model, we suppose. This double page picture of her is a wonder, with the sunlight catching a body covered in sparkling blonde hairs.  Her glistening thighs are a marvel.  She reminds Triple P of the very first naked girl he saw, on holiday in Menorca in 1975, but that is a story for another day and another blog.




Rosemarie was photographed by Geoffrey Ryan, which was one of the aliases Jeff Dunas  used if he was contributing multiple pictorials to a single magazine; which he was in this issue.  This half page picture was an unusually assertive pussy picture for Oui in this period.




Finally, Dunas again, in his third pictorial for July's Oui.  It is a two girl shoot although any implied lesbianism is dialled right back.  This photograph where one girl pulls the bikini bottoms away from the other is an unusual and effective treatment of the scenario.  So, a strong issue visually and just that little bit more explicit than some of Oui's more recent issues.




Penthouse, for the first time, followed Playboy's lead in putting a celebrity on its cover, in this case disco diva Donna Summer, photographed by Harry Langdon.  This was to publicise their interview with her inside, which made her the first Penthouse interview subject on the cover too.




Earl Miller produced the nineteen twenties themed girl/girl pictorial A Moveable Feast.  This was the first lesbian set since March's disappointing Duel in the Sun but the models. Lillian and Dorothy, in this pictorial get convincingly passionate, indulging in some proper kissing and implied cunnilingus shots.  This shot was the most explicit pussy touching shot to appear in any of Penthouse's girl/girl sets to date.





In contrast, Pet of the Month Jaycee West's pictures by Stan Malinowski were rather more modest but she looked very fine indeed in her black stockings.  Again, she is a model who appeared once and then disappeared.


Deborah Zullo


The final pictorial that issue featured a number of Pets who had appeared in a new film comedy about a tennis club called Racquet (1979).  It's not available on DVD, probably because it has had universally terrible reviews.  It had a bizarre cast which featured Sgt Bilko veteran Phil Silvers, Charlie's Angel Tanya Roberts, and tennis players Bobby Riggs, Ilie Nastase and Bjorn Borg.  It was also, according to the Penthouse article, supposed to feature Penthouse Pets Deborah Zullo, Cynthia Gaynor, Mariwin Roberts, Victoria Lynn Johnson, Carrie Nelson and Cheryl Rixon but IMDB only lists Roberts, Zullo, Johnson and Suzanne Saxon, who didn't appear in the pictorial, which featured stills from the film and Penthouse shots of the Pets.  We suspect the other Pet's parts ended up on the cutting room floor (painful!).




Genesis' cover promised "more girls than ever" for their July issue and featured this big haired lovely teasing with her unfastened bikini top.  Nice to see a girl with a smile!




There were no smiles from Chanelle, however, who while no doubt trying to look sultry just ended up looking resolutely grumpy throughout her pictorial.




Vanessa was unsmiling as well, although her fresh young face avoided the grumpiness of Chanelle.   This was, in fact, one of the very earliest pictorials of future Page 3 girl, Danish model Helle Kjaer.  We will see more of her later in this post as she appeared in August's Penthouse.






No smiles either from Pilar, photographed by Zee Gayda (who went under the name Gajda in Penthouse), but a better attempt at some sensuality in this knicker-delving shot.




Genesis also had a girl/girl set that month, Coming Home, which featured this effective pussy caressing photo.  As was often the case the accompanying text emphasised that the girls were not, in fact, lesbians but were just amusing themselves while waiting for their men to return from Barranquilla in Colombia (coincidentally, somewhere Triple P visited last year).




This particular issue of Club is of special interest to Triple P because we owned the equivalent copy of Men Only from June 1979, from which most of the pictorials were sourced.




The first young lady in the issue, Josie, shot by Diana Hardy was actually used as the centrefold in Men Only.  Hers was a softly romantic shoot and it also looks like her labia have been obscured slightly in the manner being used in the UK Raymond magazines at the time.  Usually, Club in the US used more explicit shots of the girls than appeared in Men Only but maybe this one slipped through as it was.




None of this was apparent in Dwight Fox's shots of Francis.  The pictures of her in Men Only contained no such graphic shots as the one above.  Triple P remembers this girl well from the copy of the magazine he bought in the UK during his year off between school and university.  Finding these much more explicit shots of her is a real nostalgic find, therefore.




The centrefold featured these two ladies in a mid-strength lesbian set by Barry Vincent.  Men Only in the UK had pretty much given up on girl/girl sets like this at this point in time.




Annie, by Laura Bergman is another girl we remember from Men Only but, again, shots such as this had disappeared from it in the second half of 1977.




Jay Myrdal's lesbian set, further on in the magazine, was rather stronger than the first and featured this awesomely hairy rear end shot.





Finally, we have another girl whose pictorial we remember but who had nothing like as explicit a shot as this damply revealing photograph by James Ballard.




High Society's July edition featured the magazine's "publisher" Gloria Leonard on the cover.  Set up by New York Publisher, the appropriately named, Carl Ruderman, High Society first appeared in may 1976.  The magazine itself was the brainchild of serial erotic magazine creator Peter Wolff who had already created Bachelor and Ace in 1972. Brilliant at creating new magazines his hard drinking, partying, gambling and, above all, spending ways inevitably got him moved on by publishers. He had started work at Topper, Rogue and Escapade magazines in the sixties before moving to Gallery. It was Wolff who introduced the idea of readers sending in photos of their wives and girlfriends to the magazine but this got him fired by the magazine. Ironically, Gallery's Girl next Door feature defined the magazine from then on and created a feature seized upon by many of the other magazines (such as Hustler's Beaver Hunt) which continues to this day.




Kitten Natividad in July 1979's High Society


As editor of Ace and Bachelor he developed his characteristic features of using stories and pictures contributed by readers. In 1975 he was able to create his first original magazine, High Society. Again he introduced an idea that many other magazines would copy: having a woman "publisher" so that his readers could read about sex from a girl's perspective. She wasn't really the publisher of course, in fact Sue Richards, the lady in question, was really porn starlet Bree Anthony and was just a figurehead who was replaced after two years by Gloria Leonard.


From her pictorial in July 1979's High Society. She was 39 years old at this point


Leonard was a very different prospect from Anthony, however.  Born Gale Sanrda Klinetsky in the Bronx in 1940 she worked as a Wall Street broker then went into public relations, including working as a copywriter for the then new Elektra Records and then a film company.  Returning to New York from the Caribbean in the mid seventies she went to a casting agent looking for acting work but wasn't told that her first role would be in a porn film.  She followed this uncredited role with her first credited appearance, in Radly Metzger's classic film The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976) and appeared in around forty hard core films, and directed some as well, through the rest of the seventies and eighties.


Gloria in She's So Fine (1985)


She wasn't just a figurehead but, using her PR experience, actually started to supervise shoots and layouts, write the copy and deal with the production and distribution side too.  She continued at High Society for fourteen years and is credited for introducing two innovations which became a staple of adult magazines.  Firstly, she populariesd the publishing of stills of major stars in the nude.  Before the days of VHS and the internet stars could be fairly certain that saucy scenes they had done at the beginning of their careers would be largely unseen.  This eventually morphed into Celebrity Skin magazine in 1986 and was the cause of much consternation for, and several law suits from, the stars involved.  Margot Kidder, Barbra Streisand and Ann-Margaret all sued (unsuccessfully) the magazine.


Gloria in the eighties


Leonard started to make recordings detailing forthcoming content of High Society for a pay telephone service in her sultry voice.  These became hugely popular and she persuaded publisher Ruderman to invest in more of these lines which started to generate significant revenue for the magazine.  Other magazines soon followed.


Leonard with Al Goldstein as an unlikely Romeo and Juliet


After she left High Society she went on to become the administrative director of the Adult Film Association and Chairman of the Free Speech Coalition.  She took part in many debates and talk shows espousing a very feminist view of the adult industry.  She later moved to Hawaii and died last month there after a massive stroke at the age of 73, just a couple of months after Screw publisher Al Goldstein, with whom she appeared in a December 1981 High Society pictorial about famous lovers.






Other than their very revealing pictorial of Gloria Leonard that month the magazine also had two more single girl pictorials of blonde Lorraine and the delightful Priscilla, who had a particularly engaging smile.




The other two pictorials were couples ones, although one of them was a boy/boy/girl one unashamedly based on Casablanca.  This effort was done in the popular comic book style that Hustler had also been using of late.




The final pictorial was part of High Society's regular series where a "reader" would write in with a fantsy which would then be turned into a pictorial.   That month's featured someone who had a thing about roller disco girls.  So here we have porn stars Marlene Willoughby and Marc Stevens going through some not very naughty (compared with Hustler, say) poses, although Mr Stevens does get his penis out in a couple of shots.


Willoughby in rather more determined action


Willoughby actually did some porn work with Gloria Leonard (like Leonard she was a leggy 5' 10" tall) but although she was eight years younger than the High Society publisher she started in the business several years earlier and continued in it until the mid eighties.  She also had a bit part in Married to the Mob (1988).  She would appear in some more High Society pictorials in the early eighties and we will also see her in Penthouse in the future.




Twenty-fifth anniversary playmate Candy Loving decorated the August 1979 cover in this picture by Tom Staebler.  Playboy was selling copies of the silver "disco jacket" she is wearing for $98.  Big money for 1979!




Playboy ran one of their regular features on a forthcoming (usually racy and European) film so that they could take advantage of an actress' charms.   The fellow enjoying Nastassja Kinski's toothsome posterior is none other than Italian superstar Marcello Mastroianni.  The film, Stay as you Are (1978) is about an older man (Mastroianni was 54 at the time) having a fling with a much younger girl (Kinski was 18) who. it turns out, may just be his daughter (it's never resolved).  You probably wouldn't be allowed to have a storyline like that now!




Playmate of the Month was the incandescently beautiful Dorothy Stratten, from British Colombia. Canada.   Playboy had always been looking for the big crossover Playmate: the girl who could soar up from her centrefold beginnings to superstardom.  They thought they had found her in Dorothy. This picture by Mario Casilli is both sensual and revealing for the time.




Later that year this even more revealing shot appeared in the newsstand special Bunnies Volume 2.  We will look more at the tragic figure of Stratten in one of our posts on 1980, when she became Playmate of the Year.




Twenty-fifth anniversary Playmate Candy (actually born Candis but Loving was her real surname) Loving reappeared in a special pictorial which featured another sexy bathtime shot: this time with added foam.  Loving had a tiny bit part as "Tony's girlfriend" at the end of Woody Allen's Stardust Memories (1980) the following year.  The film also has a bit part, as "pretty girl on train", for Sharon Stone, in her first film appearance.  Loving's pneumatic figure was much in evidence in Playboy and its newsstand specials for the next few years and she worked as a spokeswoman for the magazine before eventually taking a journalism degree.  She now works in healthcare insurance in Florida.




Another Phillip Dixon photographed fashion model graced Oui's Augsut cover in the lithe form of Jackie Phillips.




Astrid, by Ed Alexander, was photographed in the grounds of a Mediterranean villa and hardly displayed any fur at all with the exception of this one shot where she is cooling down her muff.




Oui's Centrefold girl, Nicolette, photographed by Jeff Dunas, showed rather more in several shots in her pictorial.   Oui had, yet again, its most revealing shot as the centrefold.



There was very little fluff on display, however, with Marana, photographed by that champion of photography of ethnic ladies, Uwe Ommer (or Omer as Oui incorrectly spelled his name).  Shot on location in India this picture looks like a nineteenth century orientalist painting.


December 1984 image for the Pirell Calendar by Uwe Ommer


German photographer Ommer is most famous for his book Black Ladies (1987) and its sequel Black Ladies 2 (1995) as well as the 1984 Pirelli Calendar where he incorporated tyre tread patterns in its pictures.  He took up photography at the age of 14 but by the late sixties he was working on fashion magazines in Paris and published his first book the same year as this pictorial; 1979.




Not a pictorial as such but an interview with pneumatic actress Adrienne Barbeau gave Oui the opportunity to print this very fine portrait.  In 1980 High Society printed some nude shots of Adrienne which she posed for in the sixties, so we will get to them in due course.




Oui's final pictorial that month was called The Girls of Brazil but unlike Playboy's similarly named international features, which genuinely had photographers flying around the world to shoot the girls in their natural habitats, Oui's effort just looked like a bunch of stock shots.  Nevertheless, the feature contained this fine up the skirt picture.






Gallery, which had gone back to Playboy levels of explicitness actually featured a girl on the cover who was in the magazine.  Peggy Benjamin, they claimed, was from Canada. and was shot by Marv Gittel.




The main point of the magazine was their Girl Next Door feature, however.  This issue contained a giant centrefold of their GND, Donna from Texas, who displayed two main points, with a Playboy-worthy pair of breasts.




Gunilla Lindstrom was photographed in the bright light of the Canary Islands by Peter Flodqvist.




Penthouse's August cover was a rather garish bubblegum pink, featuring centrefold Diane Weber shot by John Copeland.  It's rather surprising to find a cover photograph where the model is displaying red eye like this.




The first pictorial was another memorable one for Agent Triple P, partly because Sally Whitstable, as photographed by FW Eck, was such an atypical Penthouse model; she's all cheekbones and endless legs.




Her faux masturbation shots are particularly potent and the foreground/background alternate focus mirror ones are very effective.




As on her cover shot, Diane Weber was showing quite a lot of red eye in her centrefold pictorial but this photo is all about pussy rubbing and we can't see her eyes.  Diane disappeared too and we haven't been able to find any more pictures of her, other than the ones she did for Penthouse.


Circe/Rosemary


The same certainly can't be said for the girl who appeared in the pictorial called Siren Song by Christer Flodqvist.  Incidentally, Penthouse transposed the name of the pictorial with the one of Sally in the index.  Photographed in Greece the magazine claimed she was Greek and her name was Circe Stathakos.




In reality she was well known English model Rosemary England who would appear in three softcore films in 1979 and 1980 and many more magazine pictorials.  Born Jada Smith in Bournemouth on the South Coast of England in 1955 she began her career as a magician's assistant.  She started modelling as a teenager and was soon doing Page 3 type work.


Rosemary in 1976


Her spectacular figure saw her become a successful beauty queen in competitions such as Miss Bournemouth and soon she was modelling for magazines like Mayfair under a number of aliases: principally Alana Ford, under which name she was the centrefold girl in September 1976's issue.




She appeared in Fiesta under her real first name, Jada, in their January 1977 Issue.




She was back in Fiesta again in October 1978 as the centrefold; this time under the name Gina.




The same month as her Penthouse pictorial appeared in the US she was also to be found in Knave's August 1979 issue in Britain.


September 1979


The following month she would make her third appearance in Mayfair in their September 1979 issue, displaying the sort of spectacular hip to waist ratio you just don't seem to get with modern girls.  No Photoshop in those days!


Whitehouse International first issue 1975


However, at about this time she became associated with adult magazine publisher David Sullivan, who was the great rival to Paul Raymond as a men's magazine publisher in Britain.  Sullivan made his money much faster, launching his first men's magazine, Private in 1973.  Within a few years he had half the adult magazine market in the UK with titles like Whitehouse International (cheekily named after Britain's leading anti-pornography campaigner Mary Whitehouse), Park LanePlaybirds and Lovebirds.  His girlfriend, Mary Millington, would become Britain's leading sex-symbol; not only appearing in his magazines but also a number of films he financed.


Whitehouse 1979


By 1979 Mary was in her thirties and so the rather younger Rosemary England seemed a suitable new potential starlet for Sullivan to promote.  She started to appear regularly in Sullivan's magazines, eventually getting a monthly feature where she "reported" on the sexual antics of a particular part of the country; very much in the manor of Fiona Richmond in the Paul Raymond magazines.


Whitehouse 1979


Sullivan's magazines were firmly aimed at the working class, compared with the likes of Penthouse and Mayfair. They had no literary or lifestyle pretensions and the poses of  their models were more in the vein of Hustler than Men Only, which, like the other Raymond magazines became less explicit from late 1977 through to the early eighties. 


Rosemary gets explored by Mary Millington in Whitehouse in 1979


As a result of posing for Sullivan's magazines, Rosemary's pictorials became much more explicit than those she had posed for up until that point.  Sullivan's magazines had regular lesbian photo shoots which, although not as strong as some of the US mainstream magazines like Hustler, were a lot stronger than Club International or Men Only.


Rosemary checks that the penis in question isn't too stiff for the authorities: from the Whitehouse article on Derby


Sullivan's magazines had more couples pictorials than the Paul Raymond stable, which had essentially given up on these by this time.  He pushed at the very edge of what was permissable as regards the depiction of erections (just staying this side of full erections) in UK magazines and Rosemary was often portrayed in these pictorials in her various regular "reports" from around the UK




Rosemary appeared in  her first film, Confessions from the David Galaxy Affair (1979) which had opened in June that year.  Sullivan had had a massive financial hit with the film Come Play with Me (1977).  Millington's part in the latter was brief, despite being hugely hyped by Sullivan's magazines, and the film was universally panned, even by those working on it, but it ran in one cinema for four years: a British record to this day.  The follow up film, The Playbirds (not coincidentally, also the title of one of Sullivan's magazines) had a bigger part for Millington and was a better film (although working on a very low baseline).


Rosemary in Confessions from the David Galaxy Affair


Confessions from the David Galaxy Affair was the follow-up to The Playbirds but, again, Millington's part was small, despite her image being the dominant female one of the poster.  Rosemary's image can be seen at the far right.  Going back to her glamour roots she played a nude beauty queen, Miss Beauty Bust and has a sex scene with Alan Lake, husband of former British fifties glamour girl and later national institution, Diana Dors, who was also in the cast.




Rosemary  was one of the best things in the film which was a critical and financial disaster, despite Sullivan pushing it hard in his magazines.  Rosemary (or Rosemarie as the Sullivan magazines always described her) is at bottom with Alan Lake in this page from Whitehouse in spring 1979.


Rosemary in Queen of the Blues (1979)


Rosemary's next film also featured Mary Millington as well, although Millington committed suicide at the age of 33 just a few weeks after it was released in August 1979.  Queen of the Blues (1979) was about a West End strip club and Rosemary does a striptease in it.


Rosemary in Sex with the Stars (1980)


Rosemary's final film, Sex with the Stars (1980), was about an astrologer trying to have sex with a woman born under each different star sign. Rosemary (using the name Poula Griffith-Jada) plays the Leo girl and is conquered in the park.   This wasn't a Sullivan financed film and the best thing about it is the soundtrack by Emmanuelle composer Pierre Bachelet.




Rosemary (second from left) in Arabian Knights (1979)


Oddly, in the reverse situation of the way these things usually happen, Rosemary had, before this trio of soft-core films, appeared in a fifteen minute hardcore short by Harrison Marks, shot earlier in 1979.  This film, Arabian Knights, was one of a number of hardcore films Marks made for Denmark's Color Climax for the European market.


Rosemary (right) in Arabian Knights


Shot in the pool area of the Hotel Julius Caesar in Bayswater (now the rather chic Hotel Caesar) over two days in early 1979 the film featured actor and wrestler Milton Reid, who was a friend of Marks, in a non-sex part.


Milton Reid in Arabian Knights


The shaven headed Reid had appeared in many roles on film and TV (usually as a villain), including a part as a guard in Dr No (1962) and was up for the role of Oddjob in Goldfinger (1965) (eventually won by Harold Sakata, who was a friend of Triple P's father) but his previous Bond role precluded him from the part.  He later appeared, briefly, however, in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), the premier of which he attended in the company of Mary Millington, who was also a friend.








Hotel staff tipped off the press that a hardcore film was being made in the hotel and the resulting piece by an undercover journalist in The Sunday People essentially killed off Reid's career.  For the only time in her career Rosemary performs in hardcore; fellating an actor and having her pussy ejaculated on following her penetrative three way sex scene.




There were discussions about Rosemary appearing in the punk classic The Great Rock and Roll Swindle (in which Mary Millington had a small part) but it came to nothing.  Rosemary, upset by Mary Millington's death, stopped appearing in films and magazine pictorials in 1980.  She still lives in Dorset.




There were four pictorials in Penthouse for August 1979 and the final one was an effective girl/girl set by Donald Milne which contained some very bold, for Penthouse at the time, pussy stroking.




Shot in sunny Florida, the two girls by the pool, unnamed in the pictorial, were Danish models Helle Kjaer and Janine Nielsen.


The Sun 24th July 1980


The Sun 4th September 1981


This was an early pictorial by Kjaer and one of only two girl/girl ones we have been able to find; the other being a much less explicit set. Most of Kjaer's modelling appearances were in the nineteen eighties and she became a Page 3 girl from 1980.


First colour Starbird


More historically, and towards the end of her career, she became the first full colour Starbird in The Daily Star when that newspaper went colour, following Today which was the first newspaper in Britain to use coloured photographs in 1986.




Like many other Page 3 girls of the time, she did her share of paperback cover modelling.  James Hadley Chase books were adorned by a positive cornucopia of the loveliest models around and Helle was no exception.  Despite the American language and settings of most of his books Chase (real name René Brabazon Raymond) was British.  Most of these novels were written in the fifties and sixties and had nothing to do with the scantily clad Page 3 models who were on the covers.


Neue Revue, January 1980


Playmen June 1980


From 1980 until 1987 Helle appeared in a huge number of British, American and continental men's magazines.  Her appearances in UK magazines, notably Mayfair, were rather less explicit than the continental magazines she appeared in.






That said, she made an appearance, under the name Charlotte, in Whitehouse International in 1980 where her poses left little to the imagination.




She appeared as Kathi, from Florida, in the February 1980 issue of Penthouse in the US in a rather less explicit pictorial.


 |From German Lui




She had a small bust for a Page 3 girl but made up for this with a superb posterior and great legs.




From the appropriately named German magazine, Exciting


One of a number of enticing up the crack shots she posed for




She featured on the cover of Spanish Penthouse in 1986 but disappeared from the scene the following year.  Compared with most Page 3 girls from the period, there is hardly anything about her on the internet but Helle Kjaer is not an unusual name in Denmark. She didn't make any films, as far as we can discover.  It would be interesting to know what happened to this lovely girl.






There was a completely splendid cover photograph for August's Club, which Triple P well remembers from when it appeared on Men Only's cover in the UK.  Inside Art Mancini was getting Priscilla to flash her anus in the way you certainly didn't now see in the UK magazines.






Chic carried on with its particular style, epitomised by these two shots. As they claimed later, the "women in Chic are prettier than the girls in Playboy and are presented as explicitly as the girls in Hustler".  The first point is debatable but their girls were very attractive and they featured top photographers.  Erika (above) is shot by none other than veteran Playboy photographer Ron Vogel who shot ten centrefolds and three covers for Hefner's magazine in the period from 1958 until 1968.






Regina's pictorial was actually entitled sophisticated lady and had her presented in typical Larry Flynt style by Clive McLean.




Talking of Hustler, the August issue included a long account of Larry Flynt's latest trial, this time in Atlanta.  Flynt went to court in March 1979 accused of selling obscene materials in Fulton County.  This was as a result of a deliberate act by Flynt where he had personally sold several issues of both Chic and Hustler in a rented store.  Flynt needn't have stood trial personally, the crime was a misdemeanor and the authorities would have preferred to sue Flynt's corporation, but he wanted to make a point about free speech.  The trial was conducted before  a blatantly biased judge who wouldn't let many of Flynt's defence witnesses testify in front of the jury.  Much of the discussion of the content of Flynt's magazine focussed on the very pictorial, depicting a black man and a white girl (porn star Desiree Cousteau) together, which Joseph Paul Franklin later confessed outraged him so much that he admitted to shooting Flynt a year before.  Flynt was found guilty and fined $27,000 and sentenced to imprisonment, although he was safe from penalties back in California.   It was just another case of fragmented local interpretation of Federal guidelines on obscenity which were making magazines like Playboy and Oui less explicit than they had been.




The first pictorial in the August issue would no doubt have outraged the jurors in Atlanta as it was a girl/girl pictorial by Suze Randall featuring plenty of pink pussies.




They would have been even more outraged by this outtake which features one girl with a strap on dildo (especially as it was a black one!) as she appears to threaten her friend's anus.  No dildo shots appeared in the magazine, however.




Hustler's honey for August, Michelle, displayed herself in typical style for James Baes.  Fetchingly her face was covered in freckles, something Hugh Hefner would never have allowed on the pages of his magazines.




The final pictorial was a not very passionate couples pictorial featuring the very busy Nancy Suiter, taking a very literal approach to the Hollywood casting couch.




The previous year it had been its pictorial on cheerleaders hitting the headlines but in 1979 the controversy that Playboy stirred up was about another of its regular pictorials featuring college students.  In November 1978 Playboy photographer David Chan turned up in Cambridge Massachusetts to place what he thought would be an innocuous small add in the university newspaper The Harvard Crimson.  The office accepted his text: "Playboy is scanning the Ivy League for a cross-section of women for the upcoming September 1979 issue" and took his cheque for $188.72 to pay for the advertisement.  Several days later, however, Chan heard that the newspaper had decided not to run it as it was“grossly at odds with the paper’s stated policy of condemning sexism and the exploitation of women".  Chan and Playboy were stunned but then delighted with the resulting publicity that saw 80 girls try out for the pictorial as a direct consequence.  As Playboy admitted in the piece accompanying the pictorial, if The Harvard Crimson had run the piece and no-one had volunteered they would have abandoned the whole project.  Playboy did back down on one thing, however.  Despite all of Playboy's college and geographic pictorials having titles starting with the words "The girls of..." Chan himself made the change to "Women of the Ivy League" on the cover when he heard that college students at the Ivy League universities he had targeted didn't like being referred to as "girls".  Oh, and it took Playboy several attempts and six months to get their cheque back from The Harvard Crimson.




When Claudia Jennings (born Mary Eileen Chesterton) became Playmate of the Month in November 1969 the magazine was still in its pre-pubic phase.   Indeed, when her pictorial appeared celebrating her becoming Playmate of the Year in June 1970, it was destined to be the last non-pubic PotY feature. The new shots of her for this issue, however, displayed her in her full glory.  She was working as a receptionist at Playboy in Chicago when Pompeo Posar suggested she pose for the magazine. She accepted, as the $5,000 fee would enable her to move to Los Angeles to pursue an acting career.  The move proved successful and she had built up a couple of dozen appearances in TV and B-movies, especially for Roger Corman, by the time this pictorial appeared.  Earlier in 1979 she had tried out for the role of Kate Jackson's replacement on Charlie's Angels but just lost out to Shelley Hack, probably because of network concerns over her Playboy past.


Claudia in Gator Bait (1974)


Tragically, Jennings died just a few weeks after this issue came out, when her Volkswagen Beetle convertible was hit by a van on October 3rd 1979.  Her car had crossed into the other carriageway of the Pacific Coast Highway and it is thought she had fallen asleep at the wheel.




Playmate of the Month, Vicki McCarty, was one of those women who was much more than just a (very) pretty face.  A graduate with a degree in journalism from Berkeley she attended the 25th Anniversary Playmate Hunt auditions purely for the sake of  researching a piece for the Los Angeles Herald Examiner in an attempt to get an internship there. Much to her surprise she found herself as a strong candidate and Playboy wanted to take more pictures of her.  Playboy actually let Vicki write her own accompanying text for her pictorial, which discussed the dichotomy of being an academic feminist who also agreed to take her clothes off for a magazine.  An interesting rejoinder to the critics from the Ivy League universities.


Vicky in 2010 aged 56


She married a record producer and now major music mogul and had four children. She qualified as an LL.B in International Law at Cambridge University and then gained a doctorate in jurisprudence before becoming a member of  the California Bar.  She wrote a series of best selling books on relationships and family life, penned regular newspaper columns, co-wrote a Hollywood screenplay, served on the board of the Special Olympics, produced a charity record and received a woman of the year award for charity work she did with teenage mothers in South Central Los Angeles.  A force of nature indeed!  She'll be sixty next month.


Sharon Cowan keeps her end up


In the end Playboy featured about twenty Ivy Leaguers undressed and quite a few more who kept their clothes on but still posed for the magazine. Sharon Cowan, from Dartmouth, who was studying Russian, had the most revealing pose in the feature.  Letters to the magazine in coming months lauded Playboy for their restraint over some of the comments made about them by feminist objectors.  One writer pointed out how many women worked in all areas of the magazine.  The best letter, however, was from Eric Spencer who wrote: "I think it's disgusting how some women use their intelligence to get jobs that they might not have gotten by using their bodies."




Four years later Playboy would produce a newsstand special entitled College Girls which collected some of the pictures from their previous campus conference pictorials. Included was this previously unpublished shot of Princeton's Anne Helsley displaying herself in a very assertive way.




Oui actually featured a girl on the cover who had a picorial inside the magazine, for a change.  In this case, British (they claimed) model Shelby photographed by Phillip Dixon.




In their openers section Oui had some pictures of a couple actually having sex (or perhaps about to) which they could show as they were shot using infra-red thermography, which measures heat.




French model Danielle had just been made the new "face" of Spanish lingerie brand Gemma in France.  S Carter's pictorial was rather modest but this shot carried an erotic charge.




Although it was Phillip Dixon who had shot her for the cover it was Jeff Dunas who photographed Shelby for her centrefold feature.  It was almost back to his old Penthouse style for Dunas, with the centre spread.




Pia, by Jean-Pierre Bourgeois, showed rather more than most Oui girls of the period in several shots but in a nicely natural way.  The shot is still about the girl, not just her genitals, but avoids the artificial concealment being increasingly seen in UK magazines and Playboy, at the time.




Oui's final pictorial for September featured hardcore film star Monique Cardin who had appeared in seven films at this point. Triple P had a girlfriend who had a pair of thigh length socks exactly like this.  In fact it was only a month after this issue came out that we were happily stripping the girl of all her clothes except the socks, as we had fun and games in our first term at university.  So a potent picture, this!  Monique demonstrates in this picture how enticing a little flash can be.




The pictorial included several shots of Monique in action in her films, such as this one from The Secret Dreams of Mona Q.


Monique in the Secret Dreams of Mona Q


Cardin spoke about this film, in which she had the starring role as a bored housewife who fantasises about various situations, including one where she is a washing machine repair woman who, in a reversal of the usual situation, seduces the bachelor of the house.


Monique in Portrait of Seduction (1976)


Although Mona Q was billed as her first film, she also has two credits for films in 1976,  including a Portrait of Seduction where she is a brunette.


Monique with Blake Edwards and Julie Andrews during filming for 10


In the text accompanying the Oui article she spoke about wanting to move into legitimate film and mentioned that she had been hired by Blake Edwards for a forthcoming film called 10 (1979).  She had been hired for an orgy scene along with some other porn actors and actresses.  The orgy scene was cut and so she is not listed in the credits, unlike some other porn starlets such as Constance Money Candida Royal and Annette Haven who did feature in the film, albeit in brief roles.




Penthouse's September 1979 issue was a 10th anniversary (at least for the US edition) special with no less than 290 pages.  The cover girl was the tenth anniversary Pet, English model Joanne Latham, shot by Bob Guccione himself.




The first pictorial was a couples one called Swinging in the Grain, photographed by Earl Miller.  This was a successful pictorial which conveyed a real sense of attraction between the two models.  The story behind it was that she was a rancher's daughter and he was a sheep farmer's son.   Perhaps the idea was a barrier-breaking love, echoing the 1958 Glenn Ford film The Sheepman, where a sheep farmer clashes with traditional ranchers.




The pictorial contained this quite strong faux fellatio shot which may explain why it never appeared in the UK edition of Penthouse.  The voyeuristic technique of shooting through a window works well here.






These two outtakes, which didn't appear in the magazine but surfaced decades later, show, however, that there was nothing faux about the young lady's performance at all.


 As Honey in March 1978's Club


As Beverly in March 1978's Oui


The female model was Shawn Carney who did quite a lot of work in the period.  She had already appeared in Club in March 1978's issue as "Honey" and the same month in Oui as "Beverly".  We will see her again in a solo shoot by Suze Randall in February's 1981's Penthouse.


 Pelican stairs in 1979


Pelican stairs today, next to the famous Prospect of Whitby pub, founded in 1520


Cover girl and 10th anniversary Pet of the Month (although Penthouse never made such a big fuss of their anniversary centrefolds as Playboy did) was eighteen year old Page 3 girl Joanne Latham, here photographed by Bob Guccione in Wapping in the East End of London at the entrance to one of the old watermen's stairs which gave access to the river for boatmen.


Joanne in Penthouse September 1979


Joanne Latham's appearance in Penthouse resulted from a duel between Hugh Hefner and Bob Guccione as to who could sign her up for her first full frontal shots.


Tutu much. Joanne struggles with her ballet clothes


Born in Wolverhampton, in the English Midlands, in March 1961, Joanne was, initially, keen on ballet and studied it for six years, winning a scholarship to the Royal Ballet School. She was spotted by model scouts during a dancing competition and, given that she was developing a very un-balletic 40 inch bust she soon left the world of ballet for modelling and TV commercials, becoming a full time professional after leaving school at the age of 16.


The Sun May 1978


 The Daily Mirror


 The Daily Star


She made her debut in Page 3 of The Sun in March 1978 although, interestingly, The Sun thought, initially, that her bust was too big. Her 40-23-35 figure was completely wrong for fashion work and so she did more and more Page 3 type work, becoming very popular, very quickly.  She even had a TV documentary made about her in 1978.




Gallery May 1979


The race was on to get Joanne to pose fully nude for a men's magazine.  She appeared in Gallery in May 1979 but only appeared topless.  Both Hugh Hefner and Bob Guccione were after her for their respective magazines.  Guccione clinched the deal by promising her £70,000 and, more importantly for Joanne, agreeing to her demands to attend the Lee Strasberg acting studio in New York and get piano and French lessons.


Penthouse September 1979


Although comparatively modest for late seventies Penthouse, her pictorial was very much more revealing than anything Joanne had posed for to date.  Guccione began an affair with her and by the time the September Penthouse was on the newsstands the magazine was saying that she was getting a part in the new Dino de Laurentiis Flash Gordon film, through Guccione's support.  


December 1978


February 1979


February 1979


Although the finished film did include bit parts for a number of British glamour models (such as Carolyn Evans) Joanne didn't appear in it.  She was dumped, it is said, by Guccione as both mistress and Penthouse girl when he found her having sex with his son.


 August 1979







May 1981


She didn't receive much of the money promised her by Guccione (a not uncommon complaint from Penthouse Pets). Her modelling career continued to be stellar, however and she appeared in dozens of men's magazines in the US, UK and Europe.




Apart from a very few exception (such as above) she avoided the spread legs poses of the other models of the time but this didn't seem to harm her career.  She had a host of celebrity boyfriends which included, according to a number of sources, tennis player Vitas Gerulaitis, Tony Curtis, Ryan O'Neal, and even, she claims herself, a US president and a member of the Royal family.  She even ended up being the girlfriend of Hugh Hefner for a time and lived in the Playboy Mansion.




Joanne decorates the cover of Death Penalty in 1982


In 1982 she got into trouble for posing almost naked in a churchyard for the cover of the debut album of British doom metal band Witchfinder General, Death Penalty.  


Joanne (bottom left) on the cover of Friends of Hell (1983) 


She then repeated the offence the following year for the band's second album Friends of Hell where she was depicted, topless, apparently being flogged. The Reverend Andrew Collins of St Mary the Virgin church in Enville Staffordshire spoke to the police and it looked like, at one point, that everyone involved might be prosecuted under the 1860 Ecclesiastical Court Jurisdiction Act.


Fabulous in her forties


She gave up modelling in 1982 after a car accident and returned home to England where she set up a keep fit studio.  She had a daughter in 1985.  In 1999 she started working as a yoga teacher.


Still gorgeous


Joanne was one of the most beautiful glamour models of the seventies and eighties and her flawless face, coupled with her outrageous figure, saw her take the modelling world by storm.  Rumoured to be writing a book about her experiences it will be a must buy!


Victoria Lynn Johnson under review


The final pictorial in Penthouse's 10th anniversary issue was a retrospective on a decades worth of Pets of the Year, which included pages from the relevant previous issues.  This feature demonstrated how far Penthouse had moved from its pre-pubic days  at the beginning of the decade to its bold pussy displaying Pets of the late seventies.




A particularly inventive swimsuit for the cover of Genesis in September.




These shots of a nicely oiled up Margot were by photographer Peter Borsari (1939-2006),  Born in Switzerland, he moved to the US and became a top Hollywood photographer, working on portraits and shots of stars attending events. Indeed, he was under contract to several film studios to take pictures of their stars at big premieres and the like.  He did a lot of work for Playboy as well as portraits of politicians and musicians. He also took the wedding pictures of Robert Wagner and Natalie Wood.  He died at the age of 67 following complications after knee surgery.  He was buried in his birthplace, Zurich.






His pictures of Margot show a bit more panache than the average pictorial in Genesis and he mixes full body shots with enticing close ups.




Centrefold Raedar (!) Ludvigsen was a classic redhead, photographed in full on Penthouse soft-focus style by Jason Somers.




Angela, shot by Daisy, displayed a splendidly unkempt bush in her pictorial.  Genesis was a variable magazine when it came to pictorials but the September 1979 issue was better than most, visually.






A couple more potent spreads in Club with Barry Vincent's shots of Joanna displaying a lot of separated labia and a very hairy bush.




The centrefold for that issues was known only as Miss X and, again, featured in a pictorial we remember from the Men Only version, mainly because it featured the lady taking self-portraits and was called, Some day my prints will come (good grief).  This enticingly moist looking centre spread certainly didn't appear in the UK version.





Finally, we look at Hustler's September 1979 issue which had a nicely damp Melanie Sutherland on the cover, photographed by Suze Randall.  Inside, Larry Flynt's publisher's statement railed against America's continued use of capital punishment.  Indeed, when Joseph Paul Franklin. who admitted to having shot Flynt was executed in November last year Flynt objected to the execution saying "As I see it, the sole motivating factor behind the death penalty is vengeance, not justice, and I firmly believe that a government that forbids killing among its citizens should not be in the business of killing people itself."




Anyway, Hustler continued with its strange mixture of political crusading, toilet humor and lovingly photographed cunts, exemplified in this issue by Starr, photographed by James Baes.  She was remarkable in that she was completely flat chested. A girl like this would not have got into Playboy at all and Penthouse would have probably made her keep her top on, but one thing you could say for Hustler was that it did, occasionally, feature examples of a much wider selection of female body types than the other leading magazines.




Here is Wanda inspecting herself at a newsstand that only seems to sell one publication.  Perhaps it's designed to be set up in Atlanta to bait the local judiciary.




The crescent moon tattoo on her inner thigh reveals that the Hustler Honey for September is none other than Melanie Sutherland.  This gently probing shot is quite a strong one for the magazine but looks more natural, as an erotic pose, than the ridiculous labia spreading ones usually espoused by photographer Suze Randall.  Several other shots from this pictorial had Melanie fingering her pussy rather than spreading.




The final pictorial, East Side Story, featured the first girl/boy pictorial of Kelly Nichols, who had appeared in Penthouse back in May that year and would go on to have a successful career in adult films.  Hustler said that the pictorial, by Suze Randall, was a "must for all you couple-lovers who've written to us requesting more heterosexual fantasies".  Although it was not quite as graphic as some of Hustler's couples pictorials in 1979 it did contain this nicely tactile cock/stocking interface shot.




This outtake demonstrates how the gentleman involved found Kelly much more exciting, not surprisingly, than demonstrated in the pages of magazine.  He really should have taken his shoes and socks off, though!

Next time we move on to the very final quarter of the seventies before moving on to the eighties when, as a new conservatism swept America under President Ronald Reagan, the contents of men's magazines came under ever closer scrutiny.